Bucephalandra are endemic to Borneo, grown on the banks of fast flowing streams and rivers. There are hundreds of different species, most considered rare in the US aquarium trade despite their growing demand and popularity. They are very similar in appearance to Anubias, with leaves growing out of rhizomes which can be attached to any hard surface using glue or line. Their care is similar to that of Anubias and Cryptocorynes. Rhizomes with a few leaves and roots can be cut and glued or tied to rock and wood for new growth. Although considered a slow grower, they can flourish under high light as well as thrive in low tech tanks alongside Mosses, Ferns and Crypts.

Their versatility and ease in care are what make the plant so sought after for planted tanks, paludariums, terrariums, or even ponds.  Many species commonly produce flowers. 

Although some keepers may experience melting leaves when first introducing stressed Bucephalandra to a new tank much like what happens to Cryptocoryne.  The plant rarely loses all its leaves and the process of slow and gradual.  As long as the rhizome is intact, the plant will be able to bounce back and sprout new growth once acclimated to the tank.

Bucephalandra are endemic to Borneo, grown on the banks of fast flowing streams and rivers. There are hundreds of different species, most considered rare in the US aquarium trade despite their growing demand and popularity. They are very similar in appearance to Anubias, with leaves growing out of rhizomes which can be attached to any hard surface using glue or line. Their care is similar to that of Anubias and Cryptocorynes. Rhizomes with a few leaves and roots can be cut and glued or tied to rock and wood for new growth. Although considered a slow grower, they can flourish under high light as well as thrive in low tech tanks alongside Mosses, Ferns and Crypts.

Their versatility and ease in care are what make the plant so sought after for planted tanks, paludariums, terrariums, or even ponds.  Many species commonly produce flowers. 

Although some keepers may experience melting leaves when first introducing stressed Bucephalandra to a new tank much like what happens to Cryptocoryne.  The plant rarely loses all its leaves and the process of slow and gradual.  As long as the rhizome is intact, the plant will be able to bounce back and sprout new growth once acclimated to the tank.

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